COMPLIMENTARY SHIPPING ON YOUR FIRST ORDER*

Sign up to receive your code. You'll also get our newsletters, which will keep you in the loop on new artworks, emerging artists and events.

*Exclusive to U.S. shipping charges under $1000

JUST ADDED TO YOUR CART

Qty: 1

VIEW CART (0) continue shopping
Studio Visit - Laura Burke

Studio Visit - Laura Burke

Studio Visit - Laura Burke

|

Studio Visit

Laura Burke

Laura Burke is a Brooklyn based artist focused around drawing who grew up in Portland, Oregon. Her surreal still-lifes come together through distant memories and references to her fascination with art history. With a love for both painting and pottery, both practices she does not currently partake in, Burke uses both painterly gestures and ceramic subject matter in her work, integrating aforementioned loves in her process. What comes to be in her work is the nostalgic feeling of warm and simple memories, quieter moments and a slight nod to a psychedelic experiences. Read on to learn more about her practice.

 

Q.

Tell us about yourself and how you came to be an artist.

A.

I grew up in Portland, OR with remarkable working-class parents, who deeply appreciated the arts. Between them putting me in community center art classes at an early age, and my grandmother’s sometimes forceful nudging, I knew what I wanted to do with my life fairly early. It hasn’t seemed to waver since age seven.

Q.

Describe your work in three words.

A.

Sentimental, colorful, odd

Q.

What is your creative process?

A.

I try to wake up early enough to enjoy the morning, then either go through an archive of images for inspiration, or continue on something I’ve already started. I will sometimes end up in research holes. Many of my pieces are odes to art history, or practices I wish I could do. I’ve always wanted to be a painter, but never took to it, so looking at paintings has become a huge part of my practice. Admiration often sparks inspiration. That’s largely why I gravitate to colored pencils so much, they can adhere to a similar effect. So much of drawing practice feels like finding a way to begin, and once I’ve found the object, color, or scenario, the composition becomes a balancing and arranging game.

Q.

How did drawing become your medium of choice?

A.

It feels like the underdog. The history of drawing is so rooted in preliminary steps and an eventual graduation to painting- it feels rebellious to not paint. Aside from general defiance, I love how direct drawing is. There's a continuous line from head to hand that only gets broken by your utensil, and that bridge feels very sincere. There’s also something comforting about working on paper and accepting that the end result might be thrown away.

Laura Burke says:

“I’m attracted to the way objects reflect or hold light, their texture and their ability to create contrast within themselves.”

Laura Burke
Laura Burke

Q.

Where do you draw inspiration from?

A.

Mostly art history and, as stated before, things I can’t do. I’ve spent the last year looking at Maiolica Italian Renaissance pottery. This pottery was treated the same way as a masterpiece painting (at least I think so). It combines two things I love most and don’t practice - painting and pottery.

Q.

When do you make your best work?

A.

Between 7 AM to 3 PM, when I’m happy, with a large pot of coffee, and oftentimes listening to dad music.


Q.

What influence does modern culture have on your work?

A.

It’s hard to separate this question from social media. The omnipresent Instagram has proven invaluable and hindering. I’ve found some of my favorite contemporary artists on there, as well as judged myself into a corner. Sometimes I wonder if my practice could exist without it. It feels funny to admit this considering how much I struggle with all things electronic. My background is in printmaking, and before shifting to being a full-time artist I worked in two shops and assisted teachers at my alma mater’s print shop for three years prior. I was deeply rooted in nostalgia, and making editions without the added help of a computer. Sometimes it felt like I was making work in direct opposition to modern culture, but that mentality can’t hold. Art can’t help but be a direct reflection of the culture and society it was made in. As much as I love art history, I see my work fitting into a contemporary conversation.

Q.

What is your relationship with social media?

A.

Although it triggers instant gratification which sometimes leads to over usage, it’s managed to shape my career.

Q.

What influence does living in New York City have on your work? What messages or emotions do you hope to convey to your audience?

A.

The people have the biggest influence. The friends I’ve made here, especially in the creative sphere, make a plan and complete it the next day. No one has time to dawdle. I grew up in an incredibly relaxed environment where urgency wasn’t exhibited, so moving here and adjusting to a new pace forced my work forward much faster than I had anticipated. It’s almost hard to look at the things I was drawing two years ago because they feel so divorced from what I’m making now.

Laura Burke

Q.

Who are some contemporaries or figures in art history who have influenced you?

A.

Marlene Dumas, Agnes Martin, Yvonne Jacquette, Pierre Bonnard, Horace Pippin, Monet, Matisse, Jonas Wood, Tim Lahan, Anna Torma... I could keep going.

Q.

Are there any quotes or mantras that you particularly connect with?

A.

“What I hide by my language, my body utters.” from Roland Barthes’ “A Lover’s Discourse”

Q.

What do you listen to when creating?

A.

Sometimes podcasts, I love “Uhh, Yeah Dude” and “Modern Love.” But mostly music. I’ve been on a big Tim Buckley kick. I would say most of the bands or individuals I listen to are dead.

Q.

What makes you laugh?

A.

Bad movies, fart jokes, being uncomfortable

Q.

What makes you nervous?

A.

Being put on the spot, procrastinating, emails


Q.

What makes you excited about the future?

A.

Getting better! I really love where I am with my work, but I know that as I grow so will my practice. It’s really exciting to imagine the work that’ll exist 5 to 10 years down the line.




New Arrivals

View new works by Laura Burke

Explore more Works


If you would like assistance to growing your own art collection, our expert advisory team is here to help. Reach out to them for a personal consultation here.