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Studio Visit - David Kitz

Studio Visit - David Kitz

Studio Visit - David Kitz

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Studio Visit with David Kitz

For David Kitz, art is an investigative pursuit, and his camera a tool to single out and re-present complex systems. His photographic imagery is a mixture of both staged and instantaneous moments, exploring the fragility of the idea of the photograph as a document-- as a record of what is/was/has been.

 

His work investigates the representational parameters and material qualities of the medium of photography. Hyper aware of the impact that a limited frame creates in relaying the appearance of a subject, Kitz acknowledges the indexical shortcomings of all photographs. Exploiting the way the camera records three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane, he explores the ways in which his subjects respond to conflation. His interest in flatness and the idea of the photograph as a veneer has made texture, and the illusion of texture, a major focus of his work.

Q.

Tell us about yourself and how you came to be an artist…

A.

I was born and raised here in LA, and I still live and work here. It’s hard to say exactly how I came to be an artist— It’s definitely something that’s developed over time. I think I’ve always been observant and curious, and I’ve always liked making things. But it wasn’t until I started art school that I began to think of myself as an artist. That term has meant different things to me at different stages and I haven’t always felt comfortable with that term. I feel somewhat at peace with it now.

 

Q.

Describe your work in three words....

A.

Playful, flexible…..jazzy?

 

Q.

What is your creative process? Walk us through each stage - from coming up with ideas/themes/concepts you want to explore, to translating that into an artistic vision, to creating the physical artworks and installations.

A.

My pictures come about in a variety of ways. Some arise as simple snapshots while others come about more gradually. What I mean by that is some pictures start as an idea rather than a moment I come across and capture right then. In those cases, I need to create the scene I intend to shoot, and that can be a gradual process. Sometimes it can all start with an object I’ve come across and collected, knowing I want to find a way to shoot it. From there it’s all about staging it -— finding a scenario for it that complicates or activates it somehow. I’m interested in exploring how these staged pictures blend with my instantaneous pictures.

 

Q.

What draws you to photography?

A.

I love how it can be both complex and simple at the same time. The camera can be a dry and objective recording tool, but it can also impart its own qualities on the images it records. I love going through life as a photographer. I love making pictures in my mind when I don’t have a camera with me, and I love using one when I do.

 

Q.

What types of cameras do you use when shooting?

A.

I mostly shoot film, and usually use my medium format Pentax and my 35mm cameras. When I need to shoot digital, I use my Canon 5D and iPhone.

 

Q.

Where do you draw inspiration from?

A.

I honestly feel like inspiration can come from anything...it can come from a film, another artist’s work, a gardening manual, visiting a new place, or even a story told by a friend.

 

Q.

What influence does living in Los Angeles have on your work?

A.

Los Angeles is a place that is constantly changing and reinventing itself, continually being torn down and rebuilt. I grew up here and in a lot of ways I don’t feel like I live in the city I was born in. I don’t think there’s anything that you could make here that wouldn’t make sense. It feels as though anything is fair game, and to me that’s critical to making art. I like to keep the door to my studio open and hear the sounds coming from outside

 

Q.

What messages or emotions do you hope to convey to your audience?

A.

I honestly don’t hope to convey any specific emotions or messages to my audience. My only aim is to make work that brings them pause. That they are pulled in, even if momentarily, to consider what they’re viewing. I believe meaning is created in the viewer, and I hope the work triggers the thought and reflection that generates that meaning.

 

Q.

Who are some contemporaries or figures in art history who have influenced you?

A.

Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Jeff Wall, Roe Ethridge, Torbjøorn Rødland, the list goes on.

 

David Kitz says

“I love making pictures in my mind when I don’t have a camera with me, and I love using one when I do.”

Q.

What influence does modern culture have on your work? What is your relationship with social media?

A.

Modern culture is impossible to avoid and I’m sure it permeates everything I do, including my work. I think platforms like Instagram level everything in a really strange way. Images created in countless different contexts and occasions are presented in sequence, completely democratically. A picture of a natural disaster is followed by a picture of a cat, which is followed by a cosmetics ad. I think Instagram highlights how slippery an image’s meaning can be, depending on how it’s contextualized. This condition definitely factors into the way I make pictures as well as the way I edit.

 

Q.

Who are some contemporaries or figures in art history who have influenced you?

A.

Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Jeff Wall, Roe Ethridge, Torbjøorn Rødland, the list goes on.

 

Q.

Are there any quotes or mantras that you particularly connect with?

A.

Always be a beginner at something.

 

Q.

Are there any quotes or mantras that you particularly connect with?

A.

Always be a beginner at something.

 

Q.

What makes you laugh?

A.

My little boy Felix.

 

Q.

What makes you nervous?

A.

Climate Change. Nervous and angry and terrified.

 

Q.

What makes you excited about the future?

A.

My little boy Felix

 

Q.

Why do you make art?

A.

I think that there’s a lot that can’t be communicated verbally or through words. I think making art provides a way for me to communicate in ways I couldn’t otherwise. Playing music functions in a similar way. I can’t imagine my life without either.

 

About David Kitz

David Kitz's interest in flatness and the idea of the photograph as a veneer has made texture, and the illusion of texture, a major focus of his work.

 

Read More

 

Explore

The Tappan Collective and Prohibition Gallery are pleased to present an exhibition of new photographic work by David Kitz.

 

Explore Now

About David Kitz

David Kitz’s work investigates the representational parameters and material qualities of the medium of photography. Hyper aware of the impact that a limited frame creates in relaying the appearance of a subject, Kitz acknowledges the indexical shortcomings of all photographs. Exploiting the way the camera records three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane, he explores the ways in which his subjects respond to conflation. His interest in flatness and the idea of the photograph as a veneer has made texture, and the illusion of texture, a major focus of his work.

David Kitz (born 1987, Los Angeles) received his BA in Fine Art from UCLA in 2011. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

2015, FIGMENT, Group Exhibition, Angstrom Gallery, Venice, CA

2014, THREE COASTS, Group Exhibition, 734 San Julian Street, Los Angeles, CA

2014, SALON No. 12, Group Exhibition, Marine Projects, Los Angeles, CA

2013, THE 9 DUDLEY PROJECT, Group Exhibition, 9 Dudley, Venice, CA

2013, THE RIGHT ANGLE, Two Person Exhibition, American Two Shot, New York, NY

2012, APPLES & ORANGES, Two Person Exhibition, Prohibition Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

2012, EMMEFFAY #5, Group Exhibition, New Wight Gallery, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

2012, TAPPAN COLLECTIVE LAUNCH, Group Exhibition, The Jefferies Building, Los Angeles, CA 2011 NORTH//WEST//EAST//SOUTH, Solo Exhibition, Matt Lipps Gallery UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

2011, EYESORE, Solo Exhibition, UCLA Broad Installation and Project Space, Los Angeles, CA

2011, EYESORE, Two Person Exhibition, Top Tomato Market, Los Angeles, CA 2008 BITTER FINALS, Group Exhibition, Angstrom Gallery, Los Angeles, CA