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Studio Visit - Luke Chiswell

Studio Visit - Luke Chiswell

Studio Visit - Luke Chiswell

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Studio Visit

Luke Chiswell

Recently relocating from Sydney to Los Angeles, we sat down to talk to Luke Chiswell about his inspiration, his practice and the influence that skateboarding culture still plays in his life.
Read the full interview here...

 

Q.

Tell us about yourself and how you came to be an artist.

A.

I grew up in the country with the freedom to build, make things and play. I don’t know if I came to be an artist, or if I just never let go of that freedom. I first learnt about obsession through skateboarding. Being obsessed with everything that came with it, I started altering and personalizing my clothes and my skateboards, and all the while learning how to make these things for myself. I see this as the early beginnings of my artistic process. Both of these things, the freedom and emergence of a process really took hold when started going to an artist co-op to learn screen-printing and seeing all these artists at work. I just kept pulling at that thread.

Q.

Describe your work in three words.

A.

word word word

Q.

What is your creative process?

A.

I think the ideal scenario for my process is being in a soft state to be able to listen, look and wait for an idea to catch my attention and if it hangs around long enough, then I’ll have to do it. Having the freedom to play with that idea, push it around, then once I can see it, bring it back together.

Q.

Where do you draw inspiration from?

A.

At the moment my environment. Visually and physically. I just found an area near Dodger Stadium which has a bunch of fallen Australian Gum trees I’m excited about.

Luke Chiswell says:

“WHEN YOU’RE OBSESSED WITH SOMETHING LIKE SKATEBOARDING YOU IMAGINE YOUR ENVIRONMENT THROUGH IT AND INTERACT WITH ALL THESE OTHERWISE OVERLOOKED PLACES, LIKE STAIRS, GUTTERS, HANDRAILS. THEY BECOMING SOMETHING MORE WHEN YOU CAN SEE THEM.”

Luke Chiswell
Luke Chiswell

Q.

Your upbringing and involvement in skateboarding culture are a big influence on your work. How do you reflect upon that influence now, looking back?

A.

It was. Skateboarding taught me an obvious but effective approach for my work. "Imagine doing something, somewhere, somehow. Try try try till it’s done.”
When you’re obsessed with something like skateboarding you imagine your environment through it and interact with all these otherwise overlooked places, like stairs, gutters, handrails. They becoming something more when you can see them. Constantly seeing things in that way trained my imagination and practical approach. Skateboarding is now more something that I reflect on as a part of my process than something I engage with. I keep closer my early experiences of it, more than identifying with the developments in the culture since then.
I loved that skateboarding was for yourself. It wasn’t a team sport, it didn’t feel like a competition, it was on you. You’d have friends pushing you to go further but ultimately it was down to you.

Q.

Why did you decide to relocate to Los Angeles from Australia?

A.

There’s something building here in LA at the moment, lots of artists are moving out here. I wanted to be a part of that.

Q.

Material is a element you frequently experiment with and change up. Why the shift in your recent trophies from wood to glass?

A.

I recently found myself thinking of skateboarding more than skating. But still seeing things in that way. I wanted to reflect the reality of not being able to do what I once did and that if I did try it, I'd break. I wanted to show it was there and not there.

Q.

We loved your larger sculptural pieces that were created during your residency. Do you enjoy working on different scales and how does that affect your process?

A.

Thank you. I do, when it fits the idea. The size of the work is really just depicted by the work itself.

Q.

What messages or emotions do you hope to convey to your audience?

A.

I would hope that the works emotional response is unique to each person looking at it.

Luke Chiswell

Q.

Who are some contemporaries or figures in art history who have influenced you?

A.

I’m very drawn to Willem De Kooning, Lucio Fontana and Joan Mitchell.

Q.

Are there any quotes or mantras that you particularly connect with?

A.

Start where you are
Use what you have
Do what you can
Arthur Ashe

Q.

What makes you laugh?

A.

This question.

Q.

What makes you nervous?

A.

Glass Trophies on the back seat of the taxi.

Q.

What makes you excited about the future?

A.

It’s nice when you feel a little grip on your practice, just trying to tighten it.




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