Sign Up

Join the Tappan family and stay connected to the art world, including invitations to exclusive events and early access to unparalleled emerging art.

test-studio visit

Studio Visit with Georgia Elrod


Welcome to the studio of Georgia Elrod is a NYC based painter who creates her work through gouache and mixed media studies. Using the physical form in identifiable and abstract ways, Elrod looks inward at the body as a temporary architecture of ideas. Her animated use of color and fluid forms contemplates individual physicality in relation to the world around us - where they mesh, and how they interact.

Q.

Tell us about yourself and how you came to be an artist…


A.

I grew up in downtown Manhattan, and was a kid in the ‘80s and ‘90s when NYC was pretty different than it is now. Though I’ve lived in some other places, I love New York, and currently live in Brooklyn. My parents are both painters and some of my earliest memories are of making and looking at art. Growing up seeing the ups and downs of life as an artist led to phases as a young person when I rejected the idea that I too was a painter. Meanwhile, I was consistently making paintings and drawings. Life these days entails a lot of juggling, but each facet informs my work: I’m an artist, a small business owner and a curator.

Q.

Where do you draw inspiration from?


A.

I’m inspired by the people in my life, my daughter, and other artists in my community. Ideas for work appear while listening to music, reading, through conversation...and at random times, like on the subway. I’m inspired by visiting other artist’s studios.

 

Q.

Describe your work in three words...


A.

Suggestive, edges, open

Georgia Elrod says

“By letting go of anatomical rules, the works become more like poetic spaces. I’ve been cultivating pictorial simplifications of body parts and using them to complicate notions of a “universal” experience of living in a body.”

Q.

What is your creative process?

A.

Larger themes in my work become clear to me in hindsight, and through writing. Though I sometimes begin with specific formal or conceptual ideas to process in my work, they often kind of creep in through the side door. I start by making several works on paper in one sitting. These are both studies and works in their own right, and some of these become loose visual guides for larger paintings. Stemming from memory and imagination, I translate subconscious imagery into paintings that become most potent when they are unexplainable. I usually start with an initial idea in my mind and the work builds and unfolds as I go. When I surprise myself I feel I may have created a successful piece.

 

Q.

What draws you to painting the subject of interior landscapes?

A.

I’ve been making paintings that suggest bodily forms for almost ten years, though things have shifted and changed over time. This recent work initially started with a quest to understand how the human body functions, and I began thinking of ways to paint the inside of my own body. Mental images emerged of a constant body interior, of the goings-on beneath and within the skin. By letting go of anatomical rules the works become more like poetic spaces. I’ve been cultivating pictorial simplifications of body parts and using them to complicate notions of a “universal” experience of living in a body. Landscape and architecture are both setting and metaphor in my work, often providing a psychological framework for the figures and body parts. I’m interested in suggestive imagery and the simultaneity of forms. Through painting, expectations of functionality and fragility literally become marks, colors, drawing. Internal and external landscapes become abstracted through the process of thought and visualization. Having a child has informed some of this new work and continues to provide material for me.

  

Q.

Where do you draw inspiration from?

A.

I’m inspired by the people in my life, my daughter, and other artists in my community. Ideas for work appear while listening to music, reading, through conversation...and at random times, like on the subway. I’m inspired by visiting other artist’s studios.

 

Q.

When do you make your best work?

A.

This is a hard question to answer. There really isn’t a formula for me. Since becoming a mother I’ve been surprised to find a new sense of urgency and motivation in the studio.

 

Q.

What influence does modern culture have on your work?

A.

I may be able to better answer this question 20 years from now.

 

Q.

What is your relationship with social media?

A.

Not sure, it keeps changing. Kind of a love/hate relationship, I guess.

 

Q.

What influence does living in New York have on your work?

A.

I love New York for so many reasons, and I feel energized and challenged by this city on a daily basis.

 

Q.

Who are some contemporaries or figures in art history who have influenced you?

A.

Lee Lozano, Wayne Thiebaud, Nancy Davidson, Elizabeth Murray, Kerry James Marshall, Charles Burchfield, Lois Dodd, RuPaul, Ren and Stimpy...there are more!

 

Q.

What do you listen to when creating?

A.

I alternate between music and podcasts. When I’m composing images and intensely creating work I tend to listen to music.

About Sara Marlowe Hall

Sara Marlowe Hall uses paint and plaster to push painting into the realm of sculpture.

Read More

Explore

We invite you to explore our curated collection of abstract artworks by Tappan artists.

 

Explore Now

Sorry, there are no products in this collection